Solidarity under attack

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How migrant
activism in Italy (and beyond) is criminalised and used as a scapegoat for failed
EU migration politics.

Anti-racist demonstration after clashes between Casapound right-wing extremists who want a Red Cross-run refugee centre to be closed down and neighbourhood anti-fascists in Rome, Italy. September 16, 2017. Patrizia Cortellessa/ Press Association. All rights reserved.Since
the EU-Turkey refugee deal, attention has shifted back to the North Africa-Italy
route – and particularly the Libya-Italy Mediterranean route. This stretch of sea
has for decades been among the deadliest for reaching Europe, and still is;
the death rate among
migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean to enter Europe has long ago reached
the body count of a war. Refugees are still dying at a quicker rate in the Mediterranean.

Many still
remember the tragedy that occurred on October 3, 2013 off the Lampedusa coasts,
which cost the life of more than 350 men, women and children – mostly from
Eritre..

« La traque des lanceurs d’alerte » par Stéphanie Gibaud

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Connue pour être à l’origine des révélations suggérant que la banque UBS aurait organisé un vaste système de fraude fiscale et de démarchage illicite, Stéphanie Gibaud a perdu depuis tout ce qu’elle avait : emploi, logement… Alors que les lanceurs d’alerte sont essentiels dans une société démocratique, l’ancienne salariée en France de la banque suisse est toujours menacée par les procédures judiciaires 10 ans après et n’arrive pas à retrouver du travail. Et c’est loin d’être la seule. À la lecture de son nouveau livre intitulé « La traque des lanceurs d’alerte », la question se pose : peut-on qualifier de démocratiques des sociétés dans lesquelles les citoyen.ne.s détenteurs d’informations sensibles qui décident d’exposer des dysfonctionnements au sein d’entreprises privées et d’administrations sont véritablement « traqués » ?
Alors que les lanceurs d’alerte font régulièrement la une des médias, tant leur parole permet de dévoiler les mécanismes cachés utilisés aussi bien dans le privé..

All refugees want to go home. Right?

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Wanting to
return home and restore one’s country should be
a choice, not an obligation placed upon you by those also claiming to offer you
protection.

Rohingya Muslims fleeing ongoing military operations in Myanmar,cross the border to Teknaff, Bangladesh on October 08, 2017. NurPhoto//Press Association. All rights reserved.We all know the
story. On almost every continent, men, women and children are driven from their
homes by persecution, poverty, or the effects of climate change. Regardless of
geographic location or individual circumstance, we are told that refugees just
want to return home.

In January, the
UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador and Hollywood actor Ben Stiller told TIME that all
the refugees he had met professed a profound desire to eventually return home. Two months
later, Sir Paul Collier (co-author of the recently-published Refuge: Transforming
a Broken Refugee System) informed CNN’s Christiane Amanpour that most refugees are currently in developing regions
close to their ..

The 2017 Nobel Peace Prize winner is the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

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The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, a coalition of 100-plus NGOs from around the world, just won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize (Oct. 6), as the Norwegian Nobel Committee throws its weight behind the United Nations’ attempt to pass a treaty to ban nuclear weapons.

“We live in a world where the risk of nuclear weapons being used is greater than it has been for some time,” said the chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, who called out countries trying to modernize their arsenals and North Korea’s attempts to become a fully-fledged power.

Reiss-Andersen called the announcement an “encouragement” to states that haven’t backed the new treaty effort. “The international community has previously adopted prohibitions against landmines, cluster munitions, and biological weapons. Nuclear weapons are even more destructive but haven’t yet been made the object of international legal prohibition.”

The academy’s decision piles pressure on US president Donald Tr..

In a blistering move, the EU tells Monsanto it isn’t above democracy

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Monsanto, the controversial US agrochemical company, has kicked up some fresh drama in Europe.

Regulators in nations around the world have spent the last year considering the implications of three farm-industry mega-mergers, including the acquisition by Bayer, the German pharmaceutical and chemical giant, of Monsanto. That $66 billion deal, which is still pending, would make Bayer-Monsanto the world’s largest seed and agriculture chemicals company. Bayer originally expected the deal to be wrapped up in 2017, but it’s been pushed back because it still needs approval from the European Union, which is working to figure out if the merger would create unfair competition in the pesticides and seeds markets.

Friction between Monsanto and the European Parliament started when the company last week (Sept. 28) said it would not participate in an Oct. 11 hearing to consider allegations that it wrongfully influenced regulatory research regarding the safety of glyphosate—a main ingredient in one o..

Catalonia: democracy and secession

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The Catalan question is not a national question, nor a question of a nation state, but a question of democracy.

Catalonia on strike over the violence of the Guardia Civil preventing the referendum vote on October 3, 2017. NurPhoto/Press Association. All rights reserved.For DiEM25 as a pan-European and transnational movement, the
emancipatory critique of all nationalisms is a given. It is simply a matter of
principle, and therefore beyond discussion.

But that does not mean that we belong to the broad chorus of those who
ascribe “mistakes” to all parties in the dramatic crisis of the Spanish state.
The central government in Madrid, because it “overreacts”, its armed forces
because they act “disproportionately”, and the Catalan government, because it
is/was “nationalist” and therefore the main actor responsible for this crisis.

Things are not that simple.

At the heart of the matter, first of all, it is important to note once
again the complete and, in this case, infamous failure of t..

No justification for internet censorship during Catalan referendum

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The ruthless efficiency with which the Spanish government censored the internet ahead of the referendum on Catalan independence foreshadowed the severity of its crackdown at polling places on 1 October. EDRi member Electronic Frontier Foundation previously wrote about one aspect of that censorship; the raid of the .cat top-level domain registry. But there was much more to it than that, and many of the more than 140 censored domains and internet services continue to be blocked today.

It began with the seizure of the referendum.cat domain, the official referendum website, on 13 September by the Spanish military police Guardia Civil, pursuant to a warrant issued by the Supreme Court of Catalonia. Over the ensuring days this order was soon extended to a number of other and unofficial mirrors of the website, such as ref1oct.cat and ref1oct.eu, which were seized if they were hosted at a .cat domain, and blocked by Internet Service Providers (ISPs) if they were not. The fact that Spanish ISP..